Sikhism Beliefs

Sikhism emerged in India when its initial Guru was not happy with the choices of Islam and Hinduism. He and prospective gurus developed a mix between them both the religions. The world's fifth most popular religion, Sikhism, is a monotheistic religion that has beliefs in equality and service to other people.

Sikhs believe in one, Formless God, together with several names that could be understood through meditation. This idea resembles Islam, whose followers believe in only God, that has 99 names. The Mool Mantar, the very first hymn written by Guru Nanak, is recited by many Sikhs. It comprises a description of lots of the features of God: There is one God; His Name is Truth; He's the Creator; He's without dread; He's without hate; He's immortal; He's beyond birth and death; He's self-existent.

 

Animal sacrifice is prohibited, and that's the usage of animals killed in this manner.  This also means that all intoxicants - alcohol, tobacco, some other drugs, are all prohibited.

 

Core principles of Sikhism are derived from three crucial tenets:

 

honest living and a fair day's work,

sharing with others what God and life has given contributed

and live life ultimately, having an awareness of the divine within each of us.

Sikhism beliefs about God

Sikhism is a monotheistic (someone who believes in one God) faith. The understanding of God is beyond the imagination of this world. Guru Nanak also explained God as not wholly unknowable and is there in all creation of this universe. Sikhs believe that there is one God Who's all good, all-knowing, and embodies reality. He's immortal and the sustainer of everything.

At the spiritually awakened stage, God can be seen at anyplace. God has no gender, and it is not masculine and not feminine, either. Some translations introduce God as masculine wrongly. God has created life in lots of worlds.

Sikhs believe that there is one God Who's all good, all-knowing, and embodies reality. He's immortal and the sustainer of everything. Sikhs don't think God could be represented with shapes or Images so that they refuse any idol worship, which implies God is formless.

 

As per the instruction of the Guru Granth Sahib, there is just one God, everyone, be it men or women are equal before God. Anyone can directly access God.

Hair is the portion of God's creation according to Sikhs' custom, which should never be changed; that's the reason, all Sikhs carry their uncut hair and wear turbans. They also believe that they can more be focused on God having long hair, as they will hide their appearance.

 

God is everywhere and not in any particular location. However, Sikhism includes a couple of essential Gurudwaras, of which the Harimandir Sahib, also called the 'Golden Temple' at Amritsar in Punjab. This most significant Gurudwara and is believed to be the holiest shrine of Sikhism.

Sikhism History | Sikhism Founder

Guru Nanak laid down the foundation stone of Sikhism, and he was born in 1469. He preached the message of understanding and love. Nanak passed on his edified authority of this new religion to nine progressive Gurus.

Guru Gobind Singh formed the Khalsa Panth. Guru Gobind Singh selected five fearless leaders among his followers. These five leaders were prepared to save the lives of others. The reason was to ignite courage in people to defend religious freedom during the rule of the Mughal empire in India.

 

The Khalsa maintain the most noteworthy Sikh temperances of responsibility, devotion, and socially conscious. The Khalsa are people who have experienced the Sikh sanctification service and who carefully follow the Sikh Code of Conduct and Conventions and wear the endorsed physical articles of the confidence.

 

In 1708 Guru Gobind Singh proclaimed that the Sikhs no longer require living Guru and delegated his successor as Sri Guru Granth Sahib. Guru Gobind Singh abolished the rituals of priests as he felt that they had become corrupt and selfish. Sikhs are only custodians of the Guru Granth Sahib, and any Sikh is free to read it in the Gurdwara or at their home. Harmandir Sahib, also known as Golden Temple, at Amritsar in Punjab, is the most significant religious center of Sikhs. It is historical but not a mandatory place of pilgrimage or worship of Sikhism. All areas where Sri Guru Granth Sahib are kept are viewed as similarly sacred for Sikhs.

 

Guru Gobind Singh abolished the rituals of priests as he felt that they had become corrupt and egoistic. Sikhs are only custodians of the Guru Granth Sahib, and any Sikh is free to read it in the Gurdwara or at their home. Guru Gobind Singh also offered five emblems of purity and courage. These symbols, worn by all Sikhs of both sexes, are popularly known today as Five Ks:

1.  Kesh, unshorn hair;

2.  Kangha, the wooden comb;

3.  Karra, the iron (or steel) bracelet;

4.  Kirpan, the sword;

5.  and Kachera, the underwear.

 

Harmandir Sahib, also known as Golden Temple, at Amritsar in the Punjab is the most significant religious center of Sikhs. It is historical but not a mandatory place of pilgrimage or worship of Sikhism. All places where Sri Guru Granth Sahib are introduced are viewed as similarly sacred for Sikhs.

Sikhism Holy Book – Guru Granh Sahib | Sikhism God

The Guru Granth Sahib, in its current form, was initially formed by the tenth Guru, Guru Gobind Singh. The Scripture includes 5894 hymns of pure devotion written in 18 ragas from the ten Gurus and 15 Muslim and Hindu saints such as Kabir, Shiak Fareed, etc. Of those, Guru Nanak wrote 974 hymns. The hymns were initially written in various languages like Persian, medieval Prakrit, Hindi, Marathi, older Punjabi, Multani, and many regional languages.

Japji, the first Bani in the Sikh holy Scripture, Sri Guru Granth Sahib, containing the Thirty-eight brief poems of Nanak, which look at the start of the Adi Granth. It includes the vital teachings and beliefs of Sikhism and is regarded as quite significant. The poems are left in a variety of ragas and are sung by Sikh devotees as a sign of devotion and esteem to the Guru.

The hymns are mostly devotional. During functions and events, they're sung individually or within a chorus from the devotees with extreme dedication, love, and humility. The Guru Granth Sahib can also be known as the basis of all religions as it includes hymns and poetry for several holy books of different faiths. The Sikhs had ten Gurus in human form. After the tenth Guru, it was decided that henceforth the Guru Granth Sahib would become the eleventh Guru and would remain so forever as the living embodiment of the Gurus.

The Book is kept in all the Gurudwaras, the Sikh places of worship, and treated with great reverence as the "Guruji" Himself. In many Sikh households, wherever the Book is, it is kept in sacred surroundings, treated with the utmost respect, and recited with great devotion.

The Sikhs had ten Gurus in humankind, and after the tenth Guru, it had been decided that henceforth the Guru Granth Sahib would replace the teachings of Gurus. The Holy Book is kept in all of the Gurudwaras, the Sikh places of worship, and also treated with great respect as the "Guru" himself. In many Sikh families, the Book is kept at holy surroundings and handled with extreme respect and recited with great devotion. 

Sikhism Holidays

Gurupurabs are the most important holidays in Sikhism. 48-hour reading the entire Guru Granth Sahib is the familiar ritual to celebrate most of the Sikh holidays, and also preaching, prayer, and congregational worship are part of celebrations.

 

Guru Gobind Singh's Birthday - January 5th

Guru Gobind Singh Founder of Khalsa Panth and nominated the Guru Granth Sahib, the Holy Book, as his successor Guru.

 

Maghi - January 14th

Maghi commemorates the martyrdom of the "Forty Immortals," forty followers of Guru Gobind Singh who had previously deserted him, fought bravely against overwhelming Mughal army forces, and were martyred in Muktsar. Guru Gobind Singh blessed them as having achieved Mukti (liberation) and cremated them at Muktsar. On Maghi, Sikhs visit gurdwaras and listen to kirtan (hymns). Naturally, the largest gathering is at Muktsar, where an annual fair is held.

 

Hola Maholla - March 26th

Hola (or Holla) Maholla is a mela celebrated in Anandpur on the Indian festival of Holi in memory of Guru Gobind Singh. The Guru instituted this day for military exercises and mock battles, followed by music and poetry contests. The holiday is still celebrated with mock battles and displays of horsemanship and skills with the sword. There are also processions with the Sikh flag and the Guru Granth Sahib.

 

 

Baisakhi - April 13th or 14th

Vaisakhi, in April, began as a Hindu festival of thanksgiving but for Sikhs, marks the founding of the Khalsa in 1699. Those ready to be initiated into the Khalsa are usually baptized on this day, and the Sikh flag is replaced.

 

Martyrdom of Guru Arjan - June 16th

Guru Arjan, the fifth Guru, was tortured and killed by the Mughal emperor Jahangir in 1606. His sacrifice is commemorated in May.

 

Celebration of the Guru Granth Sahib - September

This festival, celebrated in August or September, commemorates the completion of the Sikh holy text in 1606.

 

Guru Nanak's Birthday - November 15th

Also in October is Guru Nanak's birthday celebration. He was born in 1469 in modern-day Pakistan.

 

Martyrdom of Guru Tegh Bahadur - November 24th

Guru Tegh Bahadur, the ninth Guru, was executed in November 1675 by the emperor Aurangzeb.